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Coins Song For Kids | A Fun Rap For Kindergarten and Up

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 Basic Math   |   Math
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Enjoy our growing library of math videos at https://www.numberock.com ◀ Safe Link

1. VIDEO'S LESSON PLAN: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Coins-and-Change-Multimedia-Unit-Counting-Coins-and-Money-up-to-a-Dollar-3386591 ◀ Safe Link

2. NUMBEROCK DIGITAL LIBRARY 70% OFF: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Math-Worksheets-More-NUMBEROCK-Musical-Math-Workbook-and-Activities-2200780 ◀ Safe Link


SUMMARY:

Join our character Gerry in his hometown by the sea as he investigates the values of common US coins. Gerry buys ice cream, dill pickles, and even describes a little bit about the history of the presidents whose faces adorn US coins!

LYRICS: US Coins

One penny is worth one cent; one nickel's worth five of them. One dime has a value of ten; one quarter's worth twenty-five cents.
Five pennies make a nickel (in cents, it's worth five).
Two nickels make ten cents (that means they're worth a dime). A quarter's twenty-five pennies, but let's make it shorter... two dimes and a nickel also equal a quarter.
I bought one delicious dill pickle for two dimes, a quarter, and a nickel. To find out how much I spent, I counted them up cent by cent.
I started with the quarter; it was worth twenty-five cents.
Each dime was worth ten, so I added both of them;
got thirty-five, forty-five, and then there was a nickel... I added five, and paid fifty cents for the pickle.
(Chorus)
I bought an ice cream in the summertime with four pennies, three quarters, and a dime. The ice cream lady looked in silence, and then she counted up my cents.
She counted the three quarters - twenty-five, fifty, seventy-five - then she added the dime. The ten cents made eighty-five, and the four pennies left made it eighty-nine.
So it was eighty-nine cents for the ice cream; I ate until my shirt popped at the seam!
(Chorus)
On the penny is the sixteenth president, Abraham Lincoln;
he wrote The Gettysburg Address and The Emancipation Proclamation. The third president, Thomas Jefferson, is on the nickel (or five cents); he was the main author of the Declaration of Independence.
The dime has Franklin Delano Roosevelt, president thirty-two;
he instituted The New Deal and led America through World War II. Finally, on the quarter is the first president, George Washington;
he was the Commander-in-Chief during the American Revolution.
(Chorus)
Five pennies make a nickel (in cents, it's worth five).
Two nickels make ten cents (that means they're worth a dime). A quarter's twenty- five pennies, but let's make it shorter... two dimes and a nickel also equal a quarter.


This video addresses the following Common Core Standards:
2.MD.C.8 - Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately. Example: If you have 2 dimes and 3 pennies, how many cents do you have?

http://www.NUMBEROCK.com is a provider of educational videos for kids which was founded by an innovative 5th Grade teacher who envisioned a new kind of classroom where students got energized for math class. Parents of his students even noticed their children singing mathematics songs around the dinner table well beyond school hours.

Seeing his students so enthusiastic when it was time for math was welcome, to say the least! But the epiphanous moment was when students were singing math songs all-day long like they were in the American Top 40!

We'll be releasing new songs and videos regularly until eventually addressing all the math skills and concepts that a Common Core Curriculum demands from 1st Grade to 2nd Grade, and even 5th Grade to 6th Grade.

Our main goal is to make teaching and learning math more fun and more interactive. SchoolHouse Rock! has done this in other subjects for us in the previous generations.

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