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Peregrine Falcons are Feathered Fighter Jets, Basically | Deep Look

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 Biology   |   Environmental   |   Science
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Description

Peregrine falcons catch other birds mid-flight by diving at more than 200 mph. To do it, they need some high-precision gear: special eyesight, talons and aerodynamics that can't be beat.

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DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small.

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While known for being the worlds fastest birdperegrines have been clocked at diving more than 200 miles per hourthese majestic birds were at risk for going extinct 50 years ago. Widespread use of pesticides such as DDT decimated native populations of peregrine falcons.

By 1970, Californias peregrine population had dwindled to only two known nesting pairs statewide. The federal government banned DDT in 1972. And successful restoration efforts spearheaded by organizations like The Peregrine Fund helped revive their numbers. By 1999, they were removed from the federal Endangered Species List. Recent surveys estimate that there are now 300 to 350 nesting pairs in California and more than 2400 pairs nationwide.

---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science:

https://www.kqed.org/science/1944037/peregrine-falcons-are-feathered-fighter-jets-basically

--- Whats the origin of the Peregrine Falcon's name?
Peregrineis Latin for "Peregrinus," which means traveler or pilgrim.

--- How many eyelids do raptors, or birds or prey, like peregrine falcons have?

They have three! Two eyelids are used for closing their eyes, while the third is used for blinking. Its also called the nictitating membrane and helps to protect their eyes and keep them moist and clean. Its semi-transparent, so they can actually still see through it when its closed.

--- Did you know they have a special bone to protect their eyes?

Its called a sclerotic ring and helps support and secure their eyeballs within their skulls.

---+ For more information:
Visit The Peregrine Fund
https://www.peregrinefund.org/

---+ More Great Deep Look episodes:

Things With Wings: https://youtu.be/a68fIQzaDBY

---+ Shoutout!

---+ Congratulations to the following fans for coming up with the best emoji or ASCII tributes to this fine feathered bird in our community tab challenge:

Sandcastle
u
lieutenant giwaffe
Sectumsempra, b****!
Sweetle pie.3.

Go look at all the entries here!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-3SbfTPJsL8fJAPKiVqBLg/community?lb=UgwOc06o6J5Zl1ssUE54AaABCQ

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---+ About KQED

KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media.

Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by the National Science Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation, Campaign 21 and the members of KQED.

#peregrinefalcon #bird #deeplook

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