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Search Results: "American Museum of Natural History"

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  • How Did Blue Whales Get So Big?

    How Did Blue Whales Get So Big?

    14 views / 0 likes - added

    Meet the largest animal that ever livedthe blue whale. Whats so great about being big? You can move faster and farther, you can avoid predators, and you can have a longer lifespan. In Part One of our four-part Giants of the Sea series, youll explore some

  • 02:55 Replacing "Snow" in the Dioramas

    Replacing "Snow" in the Dioramas

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    Cotton batting used for snow in several dioramas had yellowed significantly over the years. Museum artist Joianne Bittle Knight takes us inside the lynx diorama where the entire foreground was replaced. To achieve a realistic windblown appearance, the tea

  • 35:45 Tour the Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs  at the American Museum of Natural History!

    Tour the Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs at the American Museum of Natural History!

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    Visit your favorite theropods, maniraptors, and more during this live tour of the Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs with Museum guide Andrew Epstein, who offers highlights and fun facts, and fields viewer questions. #LearnWithMe #AMNH #Dinosaur #Museum #Trex

  • 13:26 What Color Is a Blue Whale?

    What Color Is a Blue Whale?

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    Did you know theres been a blue whale model at the American Museum of Natural History for over 100 years? The huge icon hanging in the Milstein Hall of Ocean Life has been a visitor favorite for decades. But over time, the way we see whales has changed dr

  • 03:49 Rosetta Comet Mission in 360

    Rosetta Comet Mission in 360

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    The mission: to track down and land on a comet as it moved around the Sun. After a 10-year chase, the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft found its target, Comet 67P (Churyumov-Gerasimenko), gathering new information that will fuel scientific inqui

  • 03:26 When will the Sun die?

    When will the Sun die?

    172 views / 2 likes - added

    Will our Sun shine bright forever, or will it die a fiery death? Astrophysicist Jackie Faherty explains will happen when our Sun runs out fuel, and what that means for the future of Earth and of our solar system. If you want to know about the lifespan of

  • 03:10 How long did a T. rex live?

    How long did a T. rex live?

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    Paleontologist Aki Watanabe reveals what took Tyrannosaurus rex from tiny hatchling to mega predator, as well as the evidence scientists use to learn more about a dinosaurs lifespan.If you want to learn even more about the ultimate predator, visit our new

  • 05:04 Skylight: Why Does Earth Have Seasons?

    Skylight: Why Does Earth Have Seasons?

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    The amount of daylight we experience varies throughout the year from place to place. Some places have longer days and nights than others, and the length of each day changes with the seasons. Find out why Earths tilt is the reason we have seasons.#seasons

  • 02:51 Are we alone in the universe?

    Are we alone in the universe?

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    Will we ever find intelligent life in the universe? Astrophysicist Jackie Faherty explains two ways scientists approach answering this age-old question.If you want to know if there are dinosaurs still alive today, watch this weeks Dinosaur video: https://

  • 05:40 The ABCs of Cephalopods with Conservation Biologist Samantha Cheng

    The ABCs of Cephalopods with Conservation Biologist Samantha Cheng

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    Happy Cephalopod Week! How many hearts does an octopus have? Why do some squid glow in the dark? And what does a zebra display have to do with the giant Australian cuttlefish? Museum conservation biologist Samantha Cheng takes you through the world of cep

  • 11:38 What Lives In Moss? - Pondlife, Episode #3

    What Lives In Moss? - Pondlife, Episode #3

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    Microbes aren't just found in ponds. They're also abundant in and around plants and soils. Mosses, some of the oldest plants on land, are home to many species of microbes. In Episode 3 of Pondlife, Sally and fellow Museum scientist Michael Tessler travel

  • 08:34 Pond Scum Under the Microscope - Pondlife, Episode #1

    Pond Scum Under the Microscope - Pondlife, Episode #1

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    We are surrounded by microscopic organisms that are too small to see with the naked eye. Follow Museum microbiologist Sally Warring as she reveals the invisible inhabitants of the green slime at the surface of a pond in Central Park. In this first episode

  • 02:10 Are dinosaurs still alive today?

    Are dinosaurs still alive today?

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    All dinosaurs went extinct during the Cretaceous era, right? Wrong! Paleontologist Aki Watanabe explains how birds are evolved from dinosaurs, and how T. rex had more in common with a turkey than a turtle. If you want to know if life exists elsewhere in t

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  • 26:24 The Milky Way as You’ve Never Seen It Before – AMNH SciCafe

    The Milky Way as You’ve Never Seen It Before – AMNH SciCafe

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    Fly through the galaxy with Museum astrophysicist Jackie Faherty, who takes us on a dazzling tour of new research and data visualizations made possible by recently released data from the Gaia space telescope. In April 2018, the European Space Agency’s Gai

  • 02:57 How do we know an asteroid hit Earth 66 million years ago?

    How do we know an asteroid hit Earth 66 million years ago?

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    One theory for why the dinosaurs went extinct is that an asteroid hit Earth at the end of the Cretaceous period. But since no one was alive to see it, how can we know that it really happened? Astrophysicist Jackie Faherty reveals how clues found in sedime

  • 03:16 How do we find new planets?

    How do we find new planets?

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    It’s possible to see many of the planets in our solar system just by looking up at the night sky—but only those that are largest and closest to our Sun. Astrophysicist Jackie Faherty explains a few of the more advanced astrometric techniques used to detec

  • 03:23 How do you find dinosaur fossils?

    How do you find dinosaur fossils?

    237 views / 0 likes - added

    In popular culture, paleontologists are often seen brushing sand off of a complete dinosaur skeleton with ease—but is digging for dinosaurs really that easy? Paleontologist Aki Watanabe reveals what really goes on during a fossil finding expedition. Spoil

  • 06:21 What Did a Baby T. rex Look Like?

    What Did a Baby T. rex Look Like?

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    Did you know that when Tyrannosaurus rex was a hatchling it was most likely covered in fluffy feathers? Go behind the scenes of the new exhibition T. rex: The Ultimate Predator, which opens March 11 at the American Museum of Natural History, with paleonto

  • 03:09 Did an asteroid kill the dinosaurs?

    Did an asteroid kill the dinosaurs?

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    Around 66 million years ago, all non-avian dinosaurs went extinct. Was the culprit a 6-mile wide asteroid that collided with Earth? Or did other factors contribute to the dinosaurs’ die-off? Paleontologist Aki Watanabe looks at other theories for wh

  • 02:04 Why are Fossil Shark Skeletons So Rare?

    Why are Fossil Shark Skeletons So Rare?

    203 views / 0 likes - added

    Happy Shark Week! Shark teeth are among the most common vertebrate fossils you can find, and yet fossilized shark skeletons are harder to come by. Paleontologist and Curator Emeritus John Maisey explains how sharks' cartilaginous skeletons differ from tho

  • 03:02 How Corals Hold Centuries of Ocean Climate Data

    How Corals Hold Centuries of Ocean Climate Data

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    Before we can make a plan to protect our oceans from climate change, we need to know what they were like before human impact. We haven’t been collecting ocean data for very long, but luckily one ocean marine organism has been keeping records for millennia

  • 05:16 Swimming With Giants 360

    Swimming With Giants 360

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    Earth’s oceans have been home to giant animals for hundreds of millions of years, but we know surprisingly little about their daily lives. Have you ever wondered what it would be like to swim with some of these giants of the deep? Dive into this video to

  • 05:22 Skylight: Looking Back in Time at the Speed of Light

    Skylight: Looking Back in Time at the Speed of Light

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    Light takes time to travel from stars and distant galaxies to observers here on Earth. How much have the stars changed since first emitting the light that we see tonight? How far back in time are we seeing when we look at the night sky? #lightyear #astron

  • 26:14 Technology Inspired by Nature – AMNH SciCafe

    Technology Inspired by Nature – AMNH SciCafe

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    What does a carnivorous plant have in common with the design for a water-saving toilet? What about a hungry cell with surgical equipment? It may be surprising to learn that engineers still turn to the natural world for inspiration. For Tak-Sing Wong, a pr

  • 06:23 Seven Million Years of Human Evolution

    Seven Million Years of Human Evolution

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    Scientists use fossils to reconstruct the evolutionary history of hominins—the group that includes modern humans, our immediate ancestors, and other extinct relatives. Today, our closest living relatives are chimpanzees, but extinct hominins are eve

  • 05:04 Space Volcanoes - Shelf Life 360

    Space Volcanoes - Shelf Life 360

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    Here on Earth, volcanic eruptions are dramatic manifestations of our dynamic planet. Elsewhere in our solar system, awe-inspiring extraterrestrial volcanoes—both active and extinct—provide clues to planetary formation and hints of how life may

  • 06:25 Human Population Through Time

    Human Population Through Time

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    It took 200,000 years for our human population to reach 1 billion—and only 200 years to reach 7 billion. But growth has begun slowing, as women have fewer babies on average. When will our global population peak? And how can we minimize our impact on

  • 03:26 Skylight: More Than Meets the Eye

    Skylight: More Than Meets the Eye

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    The sky is awash in light, but there’s much more beyond the visible that we cannot sense with our eyes. What do we see when we use telescopes to peer into the invisible? #astronomy #space #visiblelight #wavelength #infrared #MilkyWay #Andromeda #stars #CM

  • 03:16 Skylight: Saturn Shows Off Its Rings

    Skylight: Saturn Shows Off Its Rings

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    Saturn’s rings are captivating from any vantage point, but more so when tilted fully towards or away from Earth, as they are this October. Our understanding of Saturn, its rings, and its moons has been enriched over the past 13 years through the Cassini m

  • 07:48 The Science of Speciation – Molecular Adaptation in Vampire Bats

    The Science of Speciation – Molecular Adaptation in Vampire Bats

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    Over 20% of all living mammal species are bats, and each is adapted to a particular diet: nectar, fruit, meat, insects—even blood! Follow scientists into the jungles of Brazil, and to a genomic sequencing lab at Temple University, as they decode the evolu

  • 02:40 Spider Expert Cheryl Y. Hayashi On Silk, Webs, and More

    Spider Expert Cheryl Y. Hayashi On Silk, Webs, and More

    355 views / 1 likes - added

    How do spiders make their webs? Turns out it’s in their DNA. Spider expert and Museum curator Cheryl Y. Hayashi discusses her research into spider silk, why it’s an exciting time to be a biologist, and why natural history museums are so important to the f

  • 04:47 The Squid and the Whale: Evidence for an Epic Encounter

    The Squid and the Whale: Evidence for an Epic Encounter

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    Happy Cephalopod Week! One of the most famous dioramas in the American Museum of Natural History depicts a battle between two gigantic animals: the sperm whale and giant squid. But unlike most dioramas in the Museum’s halls, this scene has never been witn

  • 05:01 The Butterfly Conservatory in 360

    The Butterfly Conservatory in 360

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    The Butterfly Conservatory is closing for the season on May 29, 2017! This annual favorite features up to 500 live, free-flying tropical butterflies from South, Central, and North America, Africa, and Asia. Housed in a vivarium that approximates their nat

  • 02:36 Why Isn't Pterodactyl a Dinosaur?

    Why Isn't Pterodactyl a Dinosaur?

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    Are Pterodactyls and other pterosaurs considered dinosaurs? There are flying dinosaurs, right? And what are dimetrodon and plesiosaurs? Paleontologist Danny Barta explains what a dinosaur is, and is not! If you’re more of a space person, check out “Why is

  • 01:21 The Butterfly Life Cycle

    The Butterfly Life Cycle

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    Butterflies aren't born as we recognize them–they go through a process called metamorphosis to change from a caterpillar to a chrysalis to an adult butterfly. See live butterflies, moths, and chrysalises at the American Museum of Natural History's Butterf

  • 01:38 Our Senses: Touch, From Single Cell To Whiskers

    Our Senses: Touch, From Single Cell To Whiskers

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    Touch is perhaps the most primordial sense – even some single-celled organisms are able to sense pressure. Humans have many different types of touch receptors, including one that can also be found at the base of cat and mouse whiskers. OUR SENSES, a new e

  • 01:39 Our Senses: How Mammals See the World In Many Colors

    Our Senses: How Mammals See the World In Many Colors

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    Humans see a variety of colors because our eyes have three types of cone cells. But things don't look quite as vivid for some of our fellow mammals—some see in two colors, others just in black and white. Color vision evolved in primates about 35 million y

  • 24:05 The Power of Poop — AMNH SciCafe

    The Power of Poop — AMNH SciCafe

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    Did you know that some of the bacteria living inside us are essential for our health? Gastroenterologist Ari Grinspan delves into the complex world of the microbiome in the human digestive system. He explains how transplanting bacteria from healthy people

  • 01:48 Our Senses: What Sluggish Sloths Tell Us About Balance

    Our Senses: What Sluggish Sloths Tell Us About Balance

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    We don’t always think of balance as one of our senses, but scientists often consider it as essential as sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch. For a species like the three-toed sloth, however, there’s little need for this sixth sense. Check out the Muse

  • 01:37 Nature's Superheroes: The Pollution Problem

    Nature's Superheroes: The Pollution Problem

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    Increasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is causing the oceans to heat up. This is bad news for coral reefs and the animals that depend on them, such as animals with shells. Join Madeline, Charlie, and Ezra to learn about how pollution affects our envi

  • 02:22 Nature's Superheroes: More Trees Please!

    Nature's Superheroes: More Trees Please!

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    Join Francesca, Asha, and Lydia as they explore what makes trees so important, the problems trees face, and what kids like you can do to help. Learn more at OLogy, the Museum’s science website for kids: https://www.amnh.org/explore/ology/biodiversity/natu

  • 02:58 Skylight: How Does Our Solar System Move Around the Milky Way?

    Skylight: How Does Our Solar System Move Around the Milky Way?

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    The planets orbit the Sun in a fairly flat plane. How does that plane relate to the orientation of the Milky Way? If we could see the Sun moving among our night sky constellations, which direction would it be heading? Watch this video to learn how our sol

  • 26:42 Seeing Is Believing - AMNH SciCafe

    Seeing Is Believing - AMNH SciCafe

    282 views / 0 likes - added

    How do our brains make sense of the world our eyes see? How does attention affect our perception? And how is it possible to miss things even if they are right in front of us? Marisa Carrasco, a professor of psychology and neural science at New York Univer

  • 02:51 Why Isn't Pluto A Planet?

    Why Isn't Pluto A Planet?

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    Why isn’t Pluto a planet anymore? And what is a planet anyway? Astrophysicist Jackie Faherty explains! If you’re more of a dinosaur person, check out “Why isn’t Pterodactyl a dinosaur?” here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m

  • 02:34 The Big Dipper Through Time

    The Big Dipper Through Time

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    Stars aren’t still--they move through space. Our Sun and the seven stars that form the Big Dipper in the constellation Ursa Major all orbit the center of the Milky Way at different speeds. So why do today’s constellations closely resemble thos

  • 02:33 Dinosaurs Among Us Now Open

    Dinosaurs Among Us Now Open

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    The evolution of life on Earth is full of amazing episodes. But one story that really captures the imagination is the transition from the familiar, charismatic dinosaurs that dominated the planet for around 170 million years into a new, small, airborne fo

  • 06:32 Shelf Life Episode 10 - The Dinosaurs Of Ghost Ranch

    Shelf Life Episode 10 - The Dinosaurs Of Ghost Ranch

    543 views / 0 likes - added

    Discovering a dinosaur is just the first step. Paleontologists Sterling Nesbitt, Mark Norell, and Danny Barta tell the story behind the Museum's treasure trove of Triassic fossils from Ghost Ranch, New Mexico. For more about how fossils are prepared for t

  • 28:55 SciCafe: Mollusks To Medicine

    SciCafe: Mollusks To Medicine

    317 views / 0 likes - added

    When you think of venomous animals, you imagine snakes, spiders, or scorpions - not snails. In this SciCafe, Mandë Holford, a research associate at the Museum and Associate Professor of chemical biology at Hunter College, discusses her research on predato

  • 03:56 Science Bulletins: Skull X-Rays Reconstruct Extinct Carnivores’ Bite

    Science Bulletins: Skull X-Rays Reconstruct Extinct Carnivores’ Bite

    411 views / 0 likes - added

    Some carnivores eat only meat, while others are more omnivorous. To understand how and when these differences in carnivore feeding may have evolved, Museum paleontologists captured X-ray scans of skulls from living and extinct species. They reconstructed

  • 06:12 Shelf Life Episode 7 - The Language Detectives

    Shelf Life Episode 7 - The Language Detectives

    485 views / 0 likes - added

    What does it take to solve a mystery about an ancient Native American language group? 16th-century missionary texts, DNA sequencing methods, and lots of algorithms. Curators Peter Whiteley and Ward Wheeler discuss their project to map the evolution of Uto

  • 01:31 Popular Origami At The Museum: Folding A Dinosaur

    Origami At The Museum: Folding A Dinosaur

    766 views / 0 likes - added

    Visit the American Museum of Natural History each holiday season to see one of New York’s most beloved displays, the Origami Holiday Tree—an annual tradition for more than forty years. Produced in partnership with OrigamiUSA, the tree is delightfully deco

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  • 02:39 Origami At The Museum: Fold A Jumping Frog In 13 Easy Steps

    Origami At The Museum: Fold A Jumping Frog In 13 Easy Steps

    658 views / 1 likes - added

    Visit the American Museum of Natural History each holiday season to see one of New York’s most beloved displays, the Origami Holiday Tree—an annual tradition for more than forty years. Produced in partnership with OrigamiUSA, the tree is delightfully deco

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  • 03:36 Origami At The Museum: Folding A Whale (Remix)

    Origami At The Museum: Folding A Whale (Remix)

    595 views / 0 likes - added

    Visit the American Museum of Natural History each holiday season to see one of New York’s most beloved displays, the Origami Holiday Tree—an annual tradition for more than forty years. Produced in partnership with OrigamiUSA, the tree is delightfully deco

    Featured
  • 01:51 How Natural Selection Works

    How Natural Selection Works

    403 views / 1 likes - added

    Through natural selection, living things have evolved over billions of years from simple cells into an awe-inspiring array of organisms. “Life at the Limits” Co-curators John Sparks and Mark Siddall explain how over time natural selection leads to changes

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  • 06:43 Shelf Life Episode 8 - Voyage Of The Giant Squid

    Shelf Life Episode 8 - Voyage Of The Giant Squid

    611 views / 1 likes - added

    Getting a giant squid from New Zealand to New York is no easy feat. Curator Neil Landman tells the tale of a sizable specimen’s journey to the collections at the American Museum of Natural History, and Curator Mark Siddall explains why this giant cephalop

  • 02:04 Deflecting Asteroids: Protecting The Earth From Future Catastrophic Events

    Deflecting Asteroids: Protecting The Earth From Future Catastrophic Events

    493 views / 0 likes - added

    Although massive asteroid impacts on Earth are rare, astronomers have identified thousands of asteroids close enough to Earth to be potentially hazardous. Learn from meteorite specialist Denton Ebel, Curator in the Division of Physical Sciences, how scien


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