KidzTube
Welcome
Login / Register

Tom and Jerry at MGM - music performed live by the John Wilson Orchestra

Thanks! Share it with your friends!

URL

You disliked this video. Thanks for the feedback!

Sorry, only registred users can create playlists.
URL


 Fine Arts   |   Music   |   Film
 Find Related Videos  added
174 Views

Description

A medley of the well-known energetic music by composer Scott Bradley from the 1940's and 1950's Tom and Jerry cartoons. Wonderfully performed live by the John Wilson Orchestra at the 2013 BBC Proms in the Royal Albert Hall in London. Arranged by Peter Morris and John Wilson.

Pete Morris, who worked on the arrangement with John Wilson, on 4 September wrote the following in response to questions about this video: "we wanted to create a score that wasn't too fragmented and that didn't rely on visuals so the music you hear is a compilation of some of the best bits of Scott Bradley's music. There is no single video for the music - it comes from eight different cartoons: Smitten Kitten, Sufferin' Cats, The Framed Cat, Cat Fishin' Just Ducky, Jerry and Jumbo, The Cat Comes to Dinner and Mouse for Sale".

On 8 september Pete Morris added: "John is a dab hand at reconstructing scores from audio. Check his Wiki page for info. In this case, however, we used score fragments, archives and a lot of patience. I used FCP to extract candidate snippets of video and linked them to create a 3 candidate narratives which John and I then worked on. Copyright is a nightmare (MGM, Warner, Sony, Turner, EMI have all owned bits in the past) - only JW has the clout to cut though that quagmire. Scores are as rare as hens' teeth."

On 16 September Pete added: "Bradley's original scores were played by typically 20 to 25 musos. In fact, if you look at the beginning of the performance there are only 3 violins, 1 viola, 1 cello and 1 bass, to start with the original MGM sound. However, more instruments are added as the piece progresses to the full 100-piece orchestra at the end. Scott Bradley also preferred orchestral sound effects to ones added by the sound department, hence the big "shock chords" that you find at various places".

Post your comment

Comments

Be the first to comment









RSS