KidzTube
Welcome
Login / Register

Why Don't Sled Dogs Ever Get Tired?

Featured

Thanks! Share it with your friends!

URL

You disliked this video. Thanks for the feedback!

Sorry, only registred users can create playlists.
URL


 Biology   |   Environmental   |   Science
 Find Related Videos  added
216 Views

Description

Thanks to Squarespace for sponsoring this video! https://squarespace.com/minuteearth

Sled dogs are the best endurance athletes in the world thanks to a weird quirk in their metabolism.

Thanks also to our supporters on https://www.patreon.com/MinuteEarth
___________________________________________

To learn more about this topic, start your googling with these keywords:

Glycolysis: The process by which glycogen is broken down into energy.
Anaerobic metabolism: The creation of energy through the combustion of carbohydrates in the absence of oxygen.
Aerobic metabolism: The creation of energy through the breakdown of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates.
ATP: The principal molecule for storing and transferring energy in cells.
Baseline Vital Signs: A subject’s temperature, pulse, respiration, blood pressure, pain, and pulse oximetry.
___________________________________________

Credits (and Twitter handles):
Script Writer: David Goldenberg (@dgoldenberg)
Script Editor: Emily Elert (@eelert)
Video Illustrator: Ever Salazar (@eversalazar)
Video Director: Kate Yoshida (@KateYoshida)
Video Narrator: Kate Yoshida (@KateYoshida)
With Contributions From: Henry Reich, Alex Reich, Peter Reich
Music by: Nathaniel Schroeder: http://www.soundcloud.com/drschroeder

_________________________________________

Like our videos?
Subscribe to MinuteEarth on YouTube: http://goo.gl/EpIDGd
Support us on Patreon: https://goo.gl/ZVgLQZ

Also, say hello on:
Facebook: http://goo.gl/FpAvo6
Twitter: http://goo.gl/Y1aWVC

And find us on itunes: https://goo.gl/sfwS6n
___________________________________________

If you liked this week’s video, we think you might also like:
Skunk Bear on the Human Vs. Horse Marathon: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vS2YVN0OAdc

___________________________________________

References:

McDougall, C. (2011). Born To Run.

McKenzie, M., Holbrook, T., Williamson, T., Royer, C., Valberg, S. ,Hinchcliff, K., Jose-Cunilleras, J., Nelson, S., Willard, M., and Davis, M. (2005). Recovery of Muscle Glycogen Concentrations in Sled Dogs during Prolonged Exercise. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 37(8). 1307-1312. Retrieved from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16118576

Poole, D. and Erickson, H. (2011). Highly Athletic Terrestrial Mammals: Horses and Dogs. Comprehensive Physiology. 6:57. 1-37. Retrieved from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23737162

Gerth, N., Redman, P., Speakman, J., Jackson, S., and Stark, J.M. (2010). Energy metabolism of Inuit sled dogs. Journal of Comparative Physiology. 180: 577-589. Retrieved from:https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20012661

Miller, B., Drake, J., Peelor, F.,, Biela, L., Geor, R., Hinchcliff, K., Davis, M., Hamilton, K. (2015). Participation in a 1000-mile race increases the oxidation of carbohydrate in Alaskan sled dogs. Journal of Applied Physiology. 118(12):1502-1509. Retrieved from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25150223

McKenzie, Ericka. (2017). Professor of large animal internal medicine at the Oregon State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Personal Communication.

Post your comment

Comments

Be the first to comment






RSS